Tag Archives: conceptual

Reaching Gifted Students

I, for one, think that North Carolina is on the right track for our gifted students.  For far too long, “proficiency” has reigned, while only recently has the emphasis on “student growth” become a center point for our state.  Unfortunately, for many gifted and over-achieving students, the emphasis on high-stakes testing and the push for proficiency has shifted the focus from all students to the students who are in danger of not making a level “3.”  Don’t get me wrong, I firmly stand on the fact that our charge as educators is to reach and teach ALL of our students with equal gusto.

Now, however, with the valuable and revealing data we gain from EVAAS in terms of both student growth and teacher effectiveness, we can paint a more accurate picture of how much our students are learning and growing each year.   Couple this data with our new Common Core State Standards and North Carolina Essential Standards, and we are beginning to develop a recipe for success.

The backward design of the Understanding by Design model by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe ensures that we begin with the end in mind.

As I work with school districts to develop their curriculum maps, pacing guides, and unit plans, I am seeing more emphasis than ever before on formative assessments, higher-order thinking, conceptual design, student choice, multiple criteria for success, and overarching essential questions.  Districts are pulling from research to make decisions that will affect instruction and student learning.

When I went back to school to work on my master’s in gifted at UNC-Charlotte under the tutelage of Dr. Brenda Romanoff, my experience changed my life, but most importantly, it changed my classroom.  I thought I was a good teacher and was told I was a good teacher, but when I learned about conceptual design, providing students with more ownership and choices, and depth over breadth, I became a much better teacher.  My program of study transformed my classroom.  Ironically, one of the most enlightening aspects of my education was learning that strategies and instructional methods that I was learning about to enhance the schooling experience for the gifted student were just as important, valuable, and effective for students who are not gifted.

I am so excited about the future of education in our state.  These curriculum changes are going to provide us all the opportunity to examine how we facilitate instruction and challenge us to take into account inquiry-based instruction, 21st century skills, and student readiness as we prepare out students to live in our exciting, stimulating, and ever-changing world.

Check out ASCD’s October 17 article on supporting gifted students by clicking here!

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How Can You Use 10×10?

As we embrace new global standards that resound with opportunities for students to connect, collaborate, think conceptually and globally, 10×10 could be a great resource in the classroom.  Data collected goes back to the year 2004, so not only do students have the opportunity to gauge the present but also look back at our past. By blending photographs, links to news articles, and a list of 100 words that matter most during this hour of time, teachers have a powerful tool in their hands.

According to their website…

10×10™ (‘ten by ten’) is an interactive exploration of the words and pictures that define the time. The result is an often moving, sometimes shocking, occasionally frivolous, but always fitting snapshot of our world.

Every hour, 10×10 collects the 100 words and pictures that matter most on a global scale, and presents them as a single image, taken to encapsulate that moment in time.

Over the course of days, months, and years, 10×10 leaves a trail of these hourly statements which, stitched together side by side, form a continuous patchwork tapestry of human life.

Major News Sources are Scanned and Analyzed to Determine Word on 10x10


Process.

Every hour, 10×10 scans the RSS feeds of several leading international news sources, and performs an elaborate process of weighted linguistic analysis on the text contained in their top news stories. After this process, conclusions are automatically drawn about the hour’s most important words. The top 100 words are chosen, along with 100 corresponding images, culled from the source news stories. At the end of each day, month, and year, 10×10 looks back through its archives to conclude the top 100 words for the given time period. In this way, a constantly evolving record of our world is formed, based on prominent world events, without any human input.

Sources.

Currently, 10×10 gathers its data from the following news sources:

Photography.

All photographs within 10×10 come from the aforementioned news sources, and full copyright ownership is maintained by those sources. 10×10 uses the images purely for artistic and educational purposes, and does not profit in any way from their use.

How to Use 10×10.

10×10 is designed to be simple and intuitive, so you should find it easy to use. When you open 10×10, you will see a grid of the top 100 world images that hour, ranked in order of importance, reading left to right, top to bottom. Along the right edge of the screen are listed the corresponding top 100 words, one for each image.

Move your mouse around the images and you’ll see which words match which images. Move your mouse up and down the word list, and the corresponding images will light up. Click any word or image to zoom in and see the news headlines behind the word. Click the headline links to read the original news stories. Click the zoomed image a second time to see the image full screen.

To move through adjacent hours, use the “Next Hour” and “Previous Hour” buttons. You can also browse through past hours, days, months, and years. To do so, click the “History” button, and then select the year/month/day/hour you’d like to see. To view the top words for a single day, month, or year, select “Full Day”, “Full Month”, or “Full Year” from the date list.

As we embrace new global standards that resound with opportunities for students to connect, collaborate, think conceptually and globally, 10×10 could be a great resource in the classroom.  Data collected goes back to the year 2004, so not only do students have the opportunity to gauge the present but also look back at our past. By blending photographs, links to news articles, and a list of 100 words that matter most during this hour of time, teachers have a powerful tool in their hands.

How could you use 10×10?

http://tenbyten.org/10×10.html

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