Understanding Text Structures

Click on the graphic above to read the original post.

In this week’s DPI RttT Weekly Update, a blog post from The Learning Network is referenced as a quality resource for providing students support with text structures.  The post, “Compare-Contrast, Cause-Effect, Problem-Solution: Common ‘Text Types’ in The Times,” provides insight about research-based literacy strategies that work well with informational texts.

The post also provides examples of both articles and non-print media from The New York Times  website that fit three different text structures:  compare-contrast, cause-effect, and problem-solution.  Articles range from topics such as Occupy Wall Street to Hand Washing in Hospitals and everything in between.  What a great way to engage students in high-interest, complex, informational texts!

These selections are student-friendly examples of informational texts.  It is important to note that each example is a sophisticated piece of writing, which coincides with the expectation for students as defined by Standard 10 of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts  — increasing students’ capacity with complex texts.

Furthermore, within the article, The Learning Network has provided modifications to some common graphic organizers that can be used as a resource while reading cause-effect, compare-contrast, and problem-solution texts.   However, one of my favorite resources in the article is the list of key signal words and phrases provided for each type of text structure to support students as they engage with the text.

This short read is truly worth your time.  The articles, graphic organizers, signal words, and non-print resources make this a great place to start when working with informational texts.

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