How Can You Use 10×10?

As we embrace new global standards that resound with opportunities for students to connect, collaborate, think conceptually and globally, 10×10 could be a great resource in the classroom.  Data collected goes back to the year 2004, so not only do students have the opportunity to gauge the present but also look back at our past. By blending photographs, links to news articles, and a list of 100 words that matter most during this hour of time, teachers have a powerful tool in their hands.

According to their website…

10×10™ (‘ten by ten’) is an interactive exploration of the words and pictures that define the time. The result is an often moving, sometimes shocking, occasionally frivolous, but always fitting snapshot of our world.

Every hour, 10×10 collects the 100 words and pictures that matter most on a global scale, and presents them as a single image, taken to encapsulate that moment in time.

Over the course of days, months, and years, 10×10 leaves a trail of these hourly statements which, stitched together side by side, form a continuous patchwork tapestry of human life.

Major News Sources are Scanned and Analyzed to Determine Word on 10x10


Process.

Every hour, 10×10 scans the RSS feeds of several leading international news sources, and performs an elaborate process of weighted linguistic analysis on the text contained in their top news stories. After this process, conclusions are automatically drawn about the hour’s most important words. The top 100 words are chosen, along with 100 corresponding images, culled from the source news stories. At the end of each day, month, and year, 10×10 looks back through its archives to conclude the top 100 words for the given time period. In this way, a constantly evolving record of our world is formed, based on prominent world events, without any human input.

Sources.

Currently, 10×10 gathers its data from the following news sources:

Photography.

All photographs within 10×10 come from the aforementioned news sources, and full copyright ownership is maintained by those sources. 10×10 uses the images purely for artistic and educational purposes, and does not profit in any way from their use.

How to Use 10×10.

10×10 is designed to be simple and intuitive, so you should find it easy to use. When you open 10×10, you will see a grid of the top 100 world images that hour, ranked in order of importance, reading left to right, top to bottom. Along the right edge of the screen are listed the corresponding top 100 words, one for each image.

Move your mouse around the images and you’ll see which words match which images. Move your mouse up and down the word list, and the corresponding images will light up. Click any word or image to zoom in and see the news headlines behind the word. Click the headline links to read the original news stories. Click the zoomed image a second time to see the image full screen.

To move through adjacent hours, use the “Next Hour” and “Previous Hour” buttons. You can also browse through past hours, days, months, and years. To do so, click the “History” button, and then select the year/month/day/hour you’d like to see. To view the top words for a single day, month, or year, select “Full Day”, “Full Month”, or “Full Year” from the date list.

As we embrace new global standards that resound with opportunities for students to connect, collaborate, think conceptually and globally, 10×10 could be a great resource in the classroom.  Data collected goes back to the year 2004, so not only do students have the opportunity to gauge the present but also look back at our past. By blending photographs, links to news articles, and a list of 100 words that matter most during this hour of time, teachers have a powerful tool in their hands.

How could you use 10×10?

http://tenbyten.org/10×10.html

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1 Comment

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One response to “How Can You Use 10×10?

  1. This is great stuff! I hope you don’t mind. Julie Taylor shared this! Thanks for all you do for our kids, Heather!

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